Guy Webster Folger (1882–1952)

©2015 Lori Cook-Folger, CG

Guy Webster Folger was born 12 February 1882 in Rio, Knox County, Illinois, and died 31 March 1952 in Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma.[1] He married twice, first to Jessie Belle Randolph on 11 February 1904 in Strang, Fillmore County, Nebraska.[2] She was born 18 November 1885 in Nebraska, the daughter of Lewis J. Randolph and Katherine “Carrie” L. Rundle, and died 5 April 1939 in Enid, Garfield County, Oklahoma.[3] His second wife was Ruth Klein who he married 22 July 1940 in Hutchinson, Kansas.[4] She was born 28 September 1905 and died 28 March 1989.[5]

Guy’s Parentage

Proof of Guy’s parentage is found in four pieces of direct evidence and one indirect. First, the will of Carrie Whiteleather Folger names her son, Guy Webster, as her executor.[6] Guy’s second wife, Ruth, named his parents on his death certificate as John Wm. Folger and Carrie Whiteleather. Carrie did not die until after Guy and Ruth’s marriage so she likely knew his mother.[7] Guy is found in John’s household in the 1895 Iowa state census.[8] This census does not give the relationship of the household members but the family matches the 1900 federal census of Fillmore County, Nebraska, where the relationship is stated.[9] Guy himself named his parents on his marriage license in 1904, to Jessie Randolph.[10]

Guy and Jessie’s Life

While a young boy, Guy’s family left Illinois to live for a time in Iowa before settling in Strang, Nebraska. As a young man of nineteen, Guy was a bit mischievous. On Halloween, in 1902, he and a friend jumped a Strang public school Professor landing them in jail for a time.[11]

Guy and Jessie Bell Randolph applied for their marriage license just days before his twenty-second birthday and married on 11 February 1904 in Strang.[12] His parents were likely hopeful he would settle down after his marriage. Jessie was born 18 November 1885, in Nebraska, one of the eight children born to Lewis J. Randolph and Carrie L. Rundle.[13] Guy and Jessie were neighbors living seventeen households apart in 1900.[14]

Two children were born to Guy and Jessie while they lived in Nebraska. The first, a daughter named Vera Ferne, was born 22 October 1904.[15] Two years later came their first son, Richard Montague, born 26 September 1906.[16]

That same year, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Oklahoma Enabling Act paving the way for statehood of Oklahoma and Indian Territories.[17] Delegates were elected and the “bitter process of writing a constitution” began. It took five months before the sheepskin copy of the constitution was signed with an alfalfa pen on 19 April 1907.[18] That November, President Roosevelt signed the Proclamation admitting Oklahoma into the Union as the 46th state.[19] The new state and plenty of farmland attracted many families, including both the Folger’s and Randolph’s. Guy and Jessie reportedly left Nebraska for a new life in Oklahoma in 1907.[20] Jessie’s parents sold their property in July 1907, after the death of Lewis’s mother, Emily, and also relocated to Oklahoma.[21] Guy, his father, John, and father-in-law, Lewis all appear in the 1908 Enid, Garfield County Directory as taxpayers, so it is likely they all moved at or near the same time.[22]

It was on their son Richard’s second birthday, 26 September 1908 that Jessie gave birth to Wayne Ogden in the new state of Oklahoma, in Fairmont,[23] Garfield County, where they were living in 1908 and 1910.[24] According to family stories, a daughter, Nellie, was born in 1911 and only lived one day. Deaths were not required to be filed until 1917 in Oklahoma, and a burial has not been found. Shaffer Funeral Home Records Index list a Folger child, 26 June 1911.[25] The last child born was Carrie Fay on 26 December 1914.[26] Guy was renting a farm trying to make ends meet. The family moved to El Reno in Canadian County for a short time and then to Morrison in the eastern part of Noble County.[27]

Noble County is located in north-central Oklahoma and is part of what was known as the Cherokee Outlet or Strip when Oklahoma was Indian Territory. It lies in the Mid-Continent oil and gas region. Natural gas wells began producing around 1915; some in the Morrison area and oil was discovered in the county in the 1920’s.[28] This was the time that the first of three major drilling booms took place in Oklahoma. It was most active between 1913 and 1920—the time that Guy moved his family there.[29]

Guy gave up farming and began working for the Oklahoma Natural Gas Company, first constructing pipeline then as a dock superintendent.[30] Oil and gas fields were being discovered quickly around this time, and Guy may have thought he could make a better living than with farming.

Guy completed draft registration cards for World War I and World War II. On both draft registrations, he is missing an eye. [31] The family story was that he raised mules for the Army and was kicked by one causing him to lose his left eye. In the early days of Oklahoma farming and the booming oil and gas industry, mules became more important than horses. They were more valuable, selling for about $54 per head versus a good horse at only $38. By 1912, Oklahoma City was the fourth largest mule market in the country with one of the best-known mule dealers in Kay County, just north of Guy’s home in Noble County. As motor-powered vehicles became more powerful the need for mules dropped but, with World War I, European nations bought over $10,000,000 in mules from Oklahoma. After 1917, when the United States entered the war, Oklahoma supplied the U.S. Army with mules.[32] Guy had already lost his eye by the time he completed his draft registration in 1918, so he likely was selling mules before the Army started buying them.

Guy was a businessman owning first, Service Truck and Construction Company, and later, Folger Welding Supply. In November of 1924, Guy was undoubtedly proud and excited when he purchased a Rumley truck for his business.[33] Things must have been going well—he bought three city lots the following spring.[34] He ran his business from one of the lots, and the family home was on another. On the evening of 18 November 1926, his truck, loaded with casings, was left on the side of the road. It is not clear if his truck had broken down or he had parked it there for some reason. A passerby, not seeing the truck in the dark, hit the truck causing damage to his car. Guy was sued and denied that it was his fault saying that it was an unavoidable accident.[35] It was just the beginning of a string of bad luck for Guy. He was unable to pay for tires and tubes purchased for the business as well as the new Rumley truck. His creditors had to file lawsuits against him that went on for several years.[36] It was hard times for many in Noble County–newspapers listed dozens of civil cases along with Guy’s.[37] On 20 January 1928, Guy was injured in an accident at the Comar oil field. He was confined to home before having surgery in Stillwater in early March.[38] While Guy was still recovering, their son Richard, “Dick,” broke his leg in four places below the knee when a pipe fell on him while working in the Braman oil field. He would spend two months in a hospital in Blackwell, about forty miles north of Perry.[39] This certainly did not help the family’s financial situation.

Jessie appears to have been a progressive woman: she purchased lot five, block one, with all improvements in Morrison on 23 January 1922, for $125.[40] The local section of the Perry newspaper tells of her business trip to Oklahoma City in 1926.[41] And she also bought the mineral rights to 80 acres in 1938, which her great grandchildren still hold.[42] Guy transferred one of the city lots he purchased in May 1925, to Jessie that November.[43] He may have been trying to protect their home as his financial woes were just beginning, but Jessie was clearly conducting her own business. She was a member and elected officer of the Perry Chapter Royal Neighbors of America.[44] Women started this fraternal organization in 1895 and today it is one of the largest women-led insurance companies. Their name was chosen based on Proverbs 27:10: “For better is a neighbor that is near than a brother that is far.” They began helping disaster victims after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and in 1921 implemented a program of financial support for their members in extreme cases of need.[45] It is possible that they helped Jessie’s family during their hardships.

Guy ran for city councilman in 1938 defeating the incumbent in his district.[46] He served for one term.

Guy and Jessie, being entrepreneurs, began raising parakeets commercially. Family members remember the aviaries in the back yard. Jessie is said to have acquired psittacosis, also known as parrot or canary fever from the birds. The disease causes influenza, typhoid, and pneumonia-like symptoms such as fatigue, fever and chills, joint and muscle aches, and cough.[47] An outbreak of the disease had occurred just ten years earlier in the northeast. The newspaper accounts suggested there would probably never be another epidemic outbreak of the disease and Jessie most likely was not worried about catching it.[48] During her illness, her physician’s had the Oklahoma Highway Patrol broadcast for blood donors who had survived the disease but were unsuccessful. The serum arrived too late to help Jessie, but the next month was rushed to a couple in Lubbock suffering the same disease.[49] Jessie died 5 April 1939.[50]

Guy married his second wife, Ruth Klein Smith, in Hutchinson, Kansas, 22 July 1940.[51] Guy was bedridden after a heart attack in 1950 and died at seventy years old on 31 March 1952.[52] He was buried next to Jessie in Grace Hill Cemetery.[53]

The children of Guy Webster Folger and Jessie Belle Randolph were:

i. VERA FERNE FOLGER, born 22 October 1904, Fillmore County, Nebraska, and died 26 January 1999 in Oklahoma.[54] She married Myrl Adolphus McCormick on 22 December 1934.[55]

ii. RICHARD MONTAGUE FOLGER, was born 26 September 1906 in Fillmore County and died in Odessa, Ector County, Texas, on 27 February 1966.[56] He married Vada Elsie Short 19 October 1930.[57]

iii.  WAYNE OGDEN FOLGER, born 26 September 1908 in Oklahoma, and died 4 October 1972 in Wichita, Sedgwick County, Kansas.[58] He married Violet Esther Allen on 31 August 1929 in Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma.[59] She was born 2 January 1913, and died 2 December 1977.[60]

iv. NELLIE FOLGER, born and died, 1911.

v. CARRIE FAYE FOLGER was born 26 December 1914 in Enid, Garfield County, Oklahoma, and died 6 January 1992 in Sun City, Maricopa County, Arizona.[61] She married Ted R. Schreiner on 24 March 1935 in Pawnee, Pawnee County, Oklahoma.[62]

 

[1] Oklahoma State Department of Health, death certificate no. 004410 (1952), Guy W. Folger; Vital Records Service, Oklahoma City.

[2] Fillmore County, Nebraska, Marriage Book 4:51, certificate no. 3082 (11 February 1904), Guy W. Folger & Jessie B. Randolph; Fillmore County Clerk, Geneva.

[3] Oklahoma State Department of Health, death certificate no. 06058 (1939), Jessie Folger; Vital Records Service, Oklahoma City. Illinois, Iroquois County, Illinois, Marriage Book B:79, Lewis Randolph to Carrie Rundle, 5 October 1881; browsable images, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : viewed 27 September 2016), imaged from FHL microfilm 1,321,548.

[4] Kansas Department of Health, marriage license no. H24645 (1940), Guy W. Folger & Ruth M. Klein; Office of Vital Statistics, Topeka.

[5] Grace Hill Cemetery, (Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma), Ruth Folger Lowe marker, transcribed and photographed by Lori Cook-Folger, 7 November 2013.

[6] Noble County, Oklahoma, Carrie Folger probate file 4731; Court Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[7] Oklahoma death certificate no. 004410 (1952), Guy W. Folger.

[8] 1895 Iowa State Census, Cass County, population schedule, Pleasant township, p. 463, dwelling 133, family 135, John W. Folger household; index and images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 30 March 2013); imaged from FHL microfilm 1,020,339.

[9] 1900 U.S. census, Fillmore, Nebraska, population schedule, Hamilton, ED 28, p. 154 (stamped), dwelling & family 24, John Folger; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 27 October 2009); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm T623, roll 926.

[10] Fillmore County, Nebraska, Marriages, 4:51, certificate no. 3082 (11 February 1904), Guy W. Folger & Jessie Randolph; Fillmore County Clerk, Geneva.

[11] “Assault the Professor,” Omaha (Nebraska) World Herald, 3 November 1902, p. 7, col. 5; digital images, Genealogy Bank (http://genealogybank.com : accessed 21 August 2014).

[12] Fillmore Co., Neb., Marriage Book 4:51.

[13] Oklahoma death certificate no. 06058 (1939) Jessie Folger. 1900 U.S. census, Fillmore County, Nebraska, population schedule, Hamilton Township, ED 28, p. 155, dwelling 40, family 42, Lewis Randolph; digital image Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 June 2009); citing NARA microfilm T623, roll 926.

[14] 1900 U.S. census, Fillmore Co., Neb. pop. sch., ED 28, p. 154 (stamped), dwell. 40, fam. 42, Lewis Randolph.

[15] Grace Hill Cemetery (Perry, Noble, Oklahoma), Vera Ferne (Folger) McCormick marker, photographed by Lori Cook-Folger, 7 September 2011.

[16] “Texas, Deaths, 1890-1976,” digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 30 Mar 2013), death certificate image, Richard Montague Folger, 27 February 1966, no. 08305, Texas Bureau of Vital Statistics; digital image from FHL microfilm 2,117,923.

[17] Dianna Everett, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture (http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/E/EN001.html : accessed 22 August 2014), “Enabling Act (1906).”

[18] “Constitution is Adopted By Oklahoma Convention,” Omaha (Nebraska) World Herald, 20 April 1907, p. 1, col. 5; digital images, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 21 August 2014). “Delegates Affix Their ‘J. Hancock’,” Guthrie (Oklahoma) Daily Leader, 20 April 1907, p. 1, col. 5; digital images, Newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : accessed 21 August 2014).

[19] “Admission of New State Celebrated With Jubilation, Inauguration Exercises and Big Barbecue,” Omaha (Nebraska) World Herald, 17 November 1907, p. 1, col. 1–2; digital images, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 21 August 2014).

[20] “Guy W. Folger Dies Monday; Services Set,” Perry (Oklahoma) Daily Journal, 1 April 1952, p. 1, col. 3; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 26 October 2009).

[21] Fillmore County, Nebraska, Deed Book 27:17; Lewis J. Randolph, 12 July 1907; Register of Deeds, Geneva. Fillmore County, Nebraska, probate case files, no. 950, Emily C. Randolph (1907) will, dated 19 November 1892; County Court Clerk’s Office, Geneva. Fillmore County, Nebraska, Deed Book 23:58–61; Elisabeth Hettinger to John W. Folger, 6 February 1900; Register of Deeds, Geneva.

[22] R.L. Polk, compiler, Enid, Oklahoma, City Directory (Sioux City: R.L. Polk & Co., 1908–1909) 261, 277; digital images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 31 March 2015).

[23] “WWII Draft Registration Cards,” database with images, Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com : accessed 14 August 2017), card for Wayne Ogden Folger, Noble County, Oklahoma.

[24] Kansas State Department of Health, death certificate no. 72-017424 (1972), Wayne O. Folger; Office of Vital Statistics, Topeka. 1910 U.S. census, Garfield County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Lincoln, enumeration district (ED) 22 p. 4B, dwelling 56, family 56, Guy W. Folger; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 27 October 2009); citing NARA microfilm T624, roll 1251.

[25] Joy Robertson, compiler, “Shaffer Funeral Home Records, Enid, Oklahoma,” index, Garfield County, Oklahoma Genealogical Society (http://www.garfieldokgen.org/shaeffer2.htm : accessed 10 December 2014), entry for Folger (1911); citing original records now located at the Henniger-Allen Funeral Home, Enid. A phone call to the Henniger-Allen Funeral Home on 10 December 2014, revealed the only other information in the record was “interment at Rosemound,” the only cemetery by that name found in Oklahoma is in Grant County, whose records are housed at the Medford Library; no record of a Folger burial in the cemetery, per Charlene.

[26] Unknown newspaper clipping, “Schreiner Memorial Thursday,” 1992; Folger Family folder, vertical files; Cherokee Strip Museum, Perry.

[27] “Guy W. Folger Dies Monday,” Perry Daily Journal, 1 April 1952.

[28] Dianna Everett, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture (http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/N/NO003.html : accessed 25 May 2014), “Noble County.”

[29] Dan T. Boyd, “Oklahoma Oil: Past, Present, and Future,” Oklahoma Geology Notes v. 62, no. 3 (Fall 2002); online archives, Oklahoma Geological Survey (http://www.ogs.ou.edu: accessed 23 August 2014), p. 98, last paragraph.

[30] “United States World War I Draft Registration, 1917-1918,” digital image, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 23 August 2014), card for Guy Webster Folger, Noble County, Oklahoma, citing NARA microfilm publication M1509, Washington D.C.. And, 1920 U.S. census, Noble County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Autry Township, enumeration district (ED) 166 p. 145, dwelling 2, family 2, Guy Folger; digital image, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 30 March 2013); citing NARA microfilm T625, roll 1472.

[31] “United States World War I Draft Registration, 1917-1918,” digital image, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 23 August 2014), card for Guy Webster Folger, Noble County, Oklahoma, citing NARA microfilm publication M1509, Washington D.C. “United States, World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 30 March 2013), Guy Webster Folger, 1942. Noble County, Oklahoma, Carrie Folger probate file 4731; Court Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[32] Dianna Everett, Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History & Culture (http://digital.library.okstate.edu/encyclopedia/entries/H/HO031.html : accessed 15 November 2014), “Horse Industry.”

[33] “New Arrival,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Journal, 11 November 1924, p. 2, col. 4; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 16 November 2014).

[34] Noble County, Oklahoma, Deeds, 40:571-2; G.W. Folger, 1925; Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[35] Noble County, Oklahoma, District Court File 3385, Harry W. Mathis v. Guy Folger, “Amended Petition” and “Answer to Petition,” 1927–1928; District Court Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[36] Noble County, Oklahoma, District Court File 3369, Maddin-Paris Co. v. Guy Folger, dba Service Truck & Construction Co., 1926; District Court Clerk’s Office, Perry. Also, District Court and File 2913, Advance-Rumley Thrasher Co. v. G.W. Folger, 1925.

[37] “District Court Docket Is Set,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Daily Journal, 27 September 1928, p. 1, col. 4, and “Court Docket For Sessions Is Announced,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Daily Journal, 22 March 1930, p. 1, col. 7; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 26 August 2014).

[38] “Folger Will Undergo Operation On Friday,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Daily Journal, 8 March 1928, p. 1, col. 4; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 23 December 2011).

[39] “Dick Folger Suffers Broken Leg Saturday,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Daily Journal, 3 April 1928, p. 1, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : accessed 16 November 2014). Also, “Dick Folger Able To Walk On His Crutches,” 20 May 1928, p. 3., col. 3.

[40] Noble County, Oklahoma, Deeds, 36:387; Mrs. G.W. Folger, 1922; Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[41] No article title, The Perry (Oklahoma) Weekly Journal, 29 April 1926, p. 6, col. 4; digital images, Newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : accessed 16 November 2014).

[42] Noble County, Oklahoma, Royalty Conveyance Book 9:27; Mrs. G.W. Folger, 1938; Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[43] Noble County, Oklahoma, Deeds, 40:571–572; Mrs. G.W. Folger, 1922; Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[44] “Nina Neal is Elected To Head Royal Neighbors At Meeting On Friday,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Daily Journal, 3 December 1927, p. 1, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers (http://www.newspapers.com : accessed 16 November 2014).

[45] Wikipedia (http://www.wikipedia.org), “Royal Neighbors of America,” rev. 22:09, 6 November 2014.

[46] “Folger And Thele Named, Primary Election Is Held Tuesday,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Daily Journal, 17 March 1938, p. 1. col. 2; Perry Daily Journal, 1938: Jan–Jun., microfilm #18,026-162; Perry Carnegie Library, Perry, Oklahoma.

[47] David C. Dugdale, III, MD, National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health (http://www.nlm.nih.gov : accessed 23 August 2014), “Psittacosis.”

[48] Jill Lepore, NPR, (http://www.npr.org : accessed 23 August 2014), “In 1929, Parrot Fever Gripped The Country.” And, “How’s Your Health,” The Perry (Oklahoma) Weekly Journal, 7 August 1930, p. 3, col. 1; digital images, Newspapers.com (http://www.newspapers.com : accessed 16 November 2014).

[49] “Parrot Fever Kills Woman,” The Daily Ardmoreite (Ardmore, Oklahoma), 5 April 1939, p. 1, col. 4 and “Texas Couple Given Parrot Fever Serum,” The Miami (Oklahoma) Daily News-Record, 19 May 1939, p. 6, col. 7; digital images, NewspaperArchive (http://www.newspaperarchive.com : accessed 23 August 2014).

[50] Oklahoma State Department of Health, death certificate 06058 (5 April 1939), Jessie Folger; Oklahoma Vital Records, Oklahoma City.

[51] Kansas marriage license no. H24645 (1940), Guy W. Folger & Ruth M. Klein.

[52] Oklahoma State Department of Health, death certificate no. 004110 (1952), Guy W. Folger, Vital Records Service, Oklahoma City.

[53] Grace Hill Cemetery, (Perry, Noble County, Oklahoma), Guy W. and Jessie B. Folger marker, photographed by Lori Cook-Folger, 16 September 2011.

[54] Grace Hill Cemetery (Perry, Noble, Oklahoma), Vera Ferne (Folger) McCormick marker, photographed by Lori Cook-Folger, 7 September 2011.

[55] “Oklahoma, County Marriages, 1891-1959,” digital image, FamilySearch (http://www.familysearch.org : accessed 22 May 2012), Folger-McCormick, 1934.

[56] “Texas, Deaths, 1890-1976,” digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 30 Mar 2013), death certificate image, Richard Montague Folger, 27 February 1966, no. 08305; Texas Bureau of Vital Statistics; digital image from FHL microfilm 2,117,923.

[57] “Guy Folger,” obituary, Midland (Texas) Reporter-Telegram, 6 July 2010, Web edition (http://www.mrt.com : accessed 10 July 2010). Richard Folger, Midland Texas [(e-address for private use),] to Lori Cook-Folger, e-mail, 14 June 2015, “Lori’s Genealogy Research,” Folger Research Folder, Cook-Folger Collection; privately held by Cook-Folger, [(e-address) & street address for private use], Hot Springs, North Carolina, 2015.

[58] Kansas State Department of Health, death certificate no. 72-017424 (1972), Guy W. Folger; Office of Vital Statistics, Topeka.

[59] Noble County, Oklahoma, Marriage Book 12:036; Folger–Allen, 1929; Court Clerk’s Office, Perry.

[60] Kansas State Department of Health, death certificate no. 77-019867 (1977), Violet E. Folger; Office of Vital Statistics, Topeka.

[61] “Schreiner Memorial Thursday,” 1992, unknown newspaper clipping; Folger Family folder, vertical files; Cherokee Strip Museum, Perry, Oklahoma.

[62] Pawnee County, Oklahoma, Marriage Record Book 14:460, Schreiner–Folger (1935); Court Clerk’s Office, Pawnee.

Click Guy’s signature to learn more about him.